Romeo & Juliet Act II


Tiffany Howe
 

SCENE ONE    SCENE TWO     SCENE THREE    SCENE FOUR     SCENE FIVE      SCENE SIX

2.0

SUMMARY

 This "scene" contains the second and last chorus of the play.  It does not add to the action.  The purpose is to summarize for the audience Romeo's transformation.  He is over Rosaline and now he loves Juliet.  Romeo and Juliet will have to hide their love because of their feuding families.  It is not known whether the choruses were part of the original play by Shakespeare.  They might have been added later by someone writing down the play.

2.1

SUMMARY

 After the party, Romeo sneaks into the Capulet's orchard hoping he might see Juliet.  Benvolio and Mercutio are looking for Romeo but give up because they think he does not want to be found.

ANALYSIS

Benvolio and Mercutio are unaware of Romeo's new love and make references to Rosaline in order to attract him.  This is the beginning of Romeo and Juliet hiding their love.

2.2

SUMMARY

 Romeo is waiting under Juliet's window and when he sees her, yearns for her beauty.  Juliet goes out onto the balcony and, thinking she is alone, speaks.  She wishes Romeo was not a Montague and that she was not a Capulet and professes her love for Romeo.  Romeo speaks out that he will be baptized and change his name.  Juliet is surprised that someone was listening to her and inquires who is outside.  Romeo answers.  Juliet asks how he got there and says it is dangerous.  Romeo thinks he is invincible because of how much he loves Juliet.  She becomes embarrassed because he heard her proclaim her love for him.  Romeo returns the proclamation of love.  The nurse calls for Juliet a few times.  Juliet challenges Romeo's proclamation, "If that thy bent of love be honorable, thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow."  Romeo agrees to the marriage.  They reluctantly say goodnight although it is almost morning.  Both Romeo and Juliet display childlike excitement about their wedding.

ANALYSIS

 This scene is connected to the previous scene by a rhyming couplet.  The first line is Benvolio's and the second is Romeo's.  "To seek him here that means not to be found.  He jests at scars that never felt a wound."  The connection foreshadows the haste with which the decisions and actions occur in the scene.  The sequences of events are important because had Juliet known Romeo was listening she probably would not have been so quick to tell him she loved him.  She loves him, he loves her, and now they are getting married.  Their action is "too rash, too unadvised, too sudden."  The romantic tone and the pace for the rest of the play have been set.
 

2.3

SUMMARY

 Friar Laurence is up early gathering herbs.  Romeo enters and the Friar notices that he has not slept yet.  Romeo says he wants to be married to Juliet today.  The Friar thinks it is awfully sudden since the day before he was pining over Rosaline but agrees to marry them.  He has the foresight to think their marriage might end the feud of the Montague's and Capulet's.

ANALYSIS

The action is slower expressing the age of the Friar differing from the previous youthful scene of Romeo and Juliet.  The Friar is old and wise and opposes Romeo's "sudden haste."  He allows the action to be suspended and contemplated.  "They stumble that run fast."

2.4

SUMMARY

 Tybalt sent Romeo a challenge to duel and Benvolio and Mercutio are discussing it.  Romeo enters and he and Mercutio playfully make puns.  The Nurse enters looking for Romeo.  Mercutio makes fun of her and then Mercutio and Benvolio leave.  Romeo gives the Nurse the message for Juliet to meet him at the Friar's cell to be married that afternoon.  He also involves the Nurse by asking her to get a rope ladder for him so he can sneak into Juliet's chamber that night to consummate their marriage.
 

ANALYSIS

This scene sets up the driving actions of the playŚRomeo and Tybalt will fight and Romeo and Juliet will marry.  The planning is mixed in with witty dialogue and comedy.  It is ironic that the most devastating conflicts of the play are discussed so candidly.

2.5

SUMMARY

 Juliet is waiting for the Nurse to return with news from Romeo.  When the Nurse enters she is worn out from the journey and delays telling Juliet the message.  Trying to be patient, Juliet finally learns that she is to go to Friar Laurence's cell that evening to be married.

ANALYSIS

 The action shows an impatient Juliet kept in suspense.  This correlates with Romeo's haste to be married while talking to the Friar a few scenes earlier.  The Nurse, like the Friar, slows down the pace of the action with her age and experience.  Again, this contrasts the quick moving and young Juliet.

2.6

SUMMARY

 Romeo and the Friar are waiting for Juliet.  The Friar warns that they may be acting too quickly. "These violent delights have violent ends."  Romeo agrees but is so happy and in love that he does not care.  Juliet arrives and they all leave to have the wedding ceremony.

ANALYSIS

 This scene is very short but reminds the audience that there will be a tragedy.  The shortness also emphasizes the lovers rushing into the marriage.
 
 

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