FOURTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

ON ETHNOMATHEMATICS (ICEM-4)

TOWSON, MARYLAND, USA

JULY 25-30, 2010

DETAILED TIMETABLE (with titles and names of speakers for all presented papers) or brief timetable

POST-CONFERENCE UPDATES (photos, PowerPoints, videos, ISGEm list-serve info, published reports, and publication of ICEM-4 presentations)

NEWS OF ICEM-5 (July 2014 in Mozambique) (1st announcement--more will be forthcoming later)

Ethnomathematics
grew out of the history of mathematics, math education, and issues of mathematics in anthropology, sociology, and even political science. It recognizes that all cultural groups do activities that involve mathematical thinking, even if the math may not look like the traditional Eurocentric academic mathematics typically taught in schools and universities.  It may be as basic as the counting terms in various languages or the use of symmetries in craft products, or as complex and controversial as oppressed societies using mathematics to encourage open-minded thinking to challenge the authorities. Mathematics educators find ways to enrich lessons by demonstrating mathematics from other cultures, often doing some global education and teaching about world issues along the way.
 
The ICEMs are quadrennial conferences of the
International Study Group on Ethnomathematics (ISGEm).  They provide an opportunity for those interested in ethnomathematics to gather to exchange ideas formally in papers, less formally in demonstrations and field trips, and socially in conference events.  The first ICEM was held in 1998 in Granada, Spain, followed in 2002 by ICEM-2 (II-CIEM) in Ouro Preto, Brazil.  Auckland, New Zealand hosted ICEM-3 in February 2006.  Most recently, Towson, Maryland, USA, was the site of the Fourth International Conference on Ethnomathematics (ICEM-4) in 2010.  Thus, the four conferences were located on four continents!

Planning for ICEM-5 will begin soon--it is expected to be on a fifth continent--Africa--in Mozambique in 2014.  If you have suggestions, comments, or questions, you can contact Paulus Gerdes or Mogege Mosimege

ICEM-4 was held July 25-30, 2010.  Here is the brief TIMETABLE of the conference and the DETAILED TIMETABLE (with titles and speakers for all the presentations)  Briefly, the conference began on July 25 with an opening reception.  Academic and cultural presentations were on July 26-29.  On July 30, the group to a day-long excursion to Washington DC.   Click here for photos, PowerPoints of presentations, and videos of the plenary sessions.

The Chief Organizer was Lawrence Shirley, and his institution, Towson University, in Towson, Maryland, a suburb of Baltimore, was the location of the sessions.  The local sponsors of the conference were the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics and the Department of Mathematics.  The regional organizational host was the North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics (NASGEm), assisted by the Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Please send any queries or comments about ICEM-4 to Lawrence Shirley at LShirley@towson.edu or phone +1-410-704-3500

ICEM-4 has a Facebook page!  Join!

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This webpage is at http://pages.towson.edu/shirley/ICEM-4.htm .  It was last updated on 10 June 2013

(links were checked 15 July 2010--if you find a faulty link, please report it to LShirley@towson.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BRIEF SCHEDULE  (click here for the DETAILED TIMETABLE --with titles and speakers of all presented papers)


(approximate
times)

SUNDAY
JULY 25, 2010

MONDAY
JULY 26, 2010

TUESDAY
JULY 27, 2010

9-10:30

ARRIVAL

OFFICIAL OPENING and WELCOME
PLENARY: Ubi D'Ambrosio (Brazil)

PLENARY: Kay Owens (Australia)

11-1

PAPERS

PAPERS

1-2

Multicultural Buffet
Lunch

Picnic Lunch at Banneker House

2-5

CHECK IN AT PLACE OF ACCOMMODATION

PAPERS

CULTURAL ACTIVITY:
Visit to the Benjamin Banneker House and Museum  (2-3:30)

4-5:30

CONFERENCE CHECK-IN

POSTERS:

 

visit to Baltimore Inner Harbor

6-8

WELCOMING RECEPTION (with two art exhibitions) in the atrium of the Center for the Arts

Dinner: participants are on their own: Towson and Baltimore restaurant information will be made available

 


(approximate
times)

WEDNESDAY
JULY 28, 2010

THURSDAY
JULY 29, 2010

FRIDAY
JULY 30, 2010

9-10

PLENARY: Ron Eglash (United States)

PLENARY: Rik Pinxten (Belgium)

TRIP TO WASHINGTON
D.C.
--VISIT NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN, especially seeking ethnomath connections
Depart 9 am
Talk at NMAI at 10:30
Speaker:
     Florence Fasenelli
(other sight-seeing on the National Mall till 5:30; then return to Towson by about 7:30)

11-1 

PAPERS and European panel (Xaroula Stathopoulou)

PRESENTATIONS

1-2

Buffet Lunch

 Maryland-style buffet luncheon and
CLOSING PROGRAM (celebrating 25 years of the International Study Group on Ethnomathematics)

 

2-4

PAPERS and

Spanish-language panel (Maria Luisa Oliveras)

4-5:30

poster presentations

EVENING

Dinner: participants are on their own: Towson and Baltimore restaurant information will be made available


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Papers (no more proposals are being accepted) 

  (click for posters)

Please, write your paper with attention to one or more of the following questions:

1. What evidence is there, and how do we get more, that school programs incorporating ethnomathematical ideas succeed in achieving their aims for the mathematical education of learners and of their ethnomathematical aims?

2. What are the implications of existing ethnomathematical studies for mathematics and mathematics education?

3. What is the relationship between Ethnomathematics and Multicultural Mathematics and between Ethnomathematics and Social Aspects of Mathematics Education.

4. How have the developments in Indigenous knowledge throughout the world affected or influenced ethnomathematical research.

5. Ubi D’Ambrosio and his disciples advocate that Ethnomathematics offers opportunities for teaching and learning mathematics that promote a world agenda for increasing the prospects of peace and diminishing the prospects of war and conflict? To what extent does consensus exist for this perspective? Why?

6. What are the implications of existing ethnomathematics for the study of anthropology?

7. Ethnomathematics can be defined both broadly and narrowly. How do these broad versus narrow definitions influence/impact the ways in which ethnomathematics is incorporated into formal educational settings?

Practical information

Length of proposal: 2 pages plus references

The language of the papers is English and papers that are accepted will done using the APA style.

Submission Details

Please submit your proposal to ICEM4submission@gmail.com. In the subject heading please state if this is a proposal for a paper, poster, or panel (please name the panel). If you desire to have your paper go through a blind peer review for publication in the Journal of Mathematics and Culture’s focus issue, please state this in your e-mail.

Academic program committee members will screen each proposal and notify authors of the decision to accept or not accept. Accepted papers will be uploaded to the ICEM 4 website for public access and specifically for the purpose of attendees to read and study them in advance.

POSTERS

Poster sessions are an effective forum for the exchange of information and a means to communicate ideas, research, and programs.

Poster sessions may present any of the following:

• A description of an innovative culturally relevant instructional activity appropriate for classroom application (at any level)
• A presentation depicting a culturally responsive professional development technique for inservice teachers
• A report of an ethnomathematical research study
• A description illustrating the use of mathematics in a diverse culture or community

Directions for Submission: Please submit a description of the proposed poster presentation ( no more than 500 words) to icem4submission@gmail.com. (In your subject line please type Poster Submission) Proposals should describe a brief summary of the posters content and intended learning outcomes for attendees. A very brief description of the poster’s graphics, pictures, data, graphs, and/or diagrams will be helpful in the review of the proposals.

Poster session participants may place materials such as pictures, data, graphs, diagrams and narrative text on boards no larger than 4' x 8'. Posters will be on display for the entire day to which they are assigned. Participants are responsible for set up and removal. During the assigned day, participants may informally share and discuss their presentations with conference attendees.

Poster sessions are not to include product advertisements, vendor displays, etc. If you are unsure if your proposal qualifies, please e-mail Jim Barta, Chair of the Poster Sessions ( jim.barta@usu.edu

Academic Program Committee:

Saul Duarte, USA (Los Angeles Unified School District)
Barbara Garii, USA (SUNY Oswego)
the late Rex Matang, Papua New Guinea (University of Goroka)
Maria Luisa Oliveras, Spain (Universidad de Granada (Spanish-language panel organizer)
Edith Saiz, Mexico (Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia)
Charoula Stathopoulou, Greece (University of Thessaly)
Tod Shockey, (University of Toledo)(CHAIR)

The Journal of Mathematics and Culture invites authors submissions for a peer reviewed focus issue for manuscripts presented at ICEM4. If you would like your manuscript to go through the blind peer review process please state this in your submission.

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FULL DETAILED TIMETABLE (for quick reference, see the general timetable)
click here for PowerPoints of many of the presentations, videos of the plenary talks, and photos

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

SUNDAY, JULY 25

2:00 – 5:00  Shuttle service from Lutherville light-rail station to Towson University

1:00 – 5:00 Check-in at Towson Run Apartments (possibly available at Towson University Marriott Hotel and Sheraton Hotel also)

6:00 – 8:00 Opening Reception in the atrium at the Center for the Arts, including opportunities to visit two adjacent art galleries

MONDAY, JULY 26

7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast available (for purchase) in the University Union: at PAWS (1st floor) and Susquehanna Dining Room (2nd floor)

9:00 Opening Ceremony (University Union, Chesapeake 3):

Welcome greetings from:

---Towson University Provost, Marcia Welsh

---Dean of Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, David Vanko

---Chair of Department of Mathematics, Raouf Boules

---President of Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics, William Barnes (unable to attend for health reasons)

---Past President of North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics (NASGEm): William Collins

Plenary Address: Ubi D’Ambrosio: “An Ethnomathematics view of space occupation and urban culture”

10:30 Refreshment break in Chesapeake 2

11:00 – 12:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Maria do Carmo S. Domite: “The encounter of non-indigenous teacher educator and indigenous teacher: the invisibility of the challenges

Room 305: Roger Miarka: “The Role of Mathematics within Ethnomathematics

12:00 – 1:00 Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Noor Aishikin Adam: “Weaving Mathematics and Culture: Mutual Interrogation as a Methodological Approach

Room 305: Igor Verner and Khayriah Massarwe(not present): “Ethnomathematics and Multi-Cultural Education: Analysis and Construction of Geometric Ornaments

1:00 – 2:00 Multicultural Buffet Lunch, Chesapeake 2

2:00 – 3:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Thomas Gilsdorf: “Tham Larutluc: How Culture Affects Our Understanding of Ethnomathematics

Room 305: Daniel Orey and Milton Rosa: “Ethnomodeling: A Pedagogical Action for the Ethnomathematics Program

3:00 – 4:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Linda Furuto and David Furuto: “Bridging Policy and Practice Through Ethnomathematics Voyaging in the Pacific

Room 305: S. Louise Gould: “What is the role of the ethnomathematics in  primary and secondary teacher education?

4:00 – 5:30: Poster Sessions

Chesapeake 3:

4:00 Barba Patton: “Read left to right: Not true for all math illustrations

4:20 Michaele Chappell and Denisse Thompson: “Films: Cultural Media for Exploring Mathematics

4:40 Ana Lúcia Braz Dias: “An Account of the Construction of Mathematical Knowledge in Uril, a Capeverdean Game

5:00 Shu-Huei Yen and Hui-Min Chou: “Advancing Indigenous students’ learning of mathematics: Lessons learned from exemplary teachers in Taiwan

Evening: open, dinner on your own (walk into Towson downtown)

click here for PowerPoints of many of the presentations, videos of the plenary talks, and photos

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

TUESDAY, JULY 27

7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast available (for purchase) in the University Union: at PAWS (1st floor) and Susquehanna Dining Room (2nd floor)

9:00 Opening Ceremony (University Union, Chesapeake 3):

---Tribute to original peoples, Kay Owens

---Memorial for Rex Matang, Kay Owens

Plenary Address: Kay Owens: “Policy and Practices: Indigenous Voices in Education”

10:30 – 11:30 Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Ada Kapsap: “Bedouin School Students Dealing with Ethnomathematical Problems: Are these an effective tool to succeed in learning and for gaining insight into mathematics?

Room 305: Maria Cecilia de Castello Branco Fantinato: “Ethnomathematics and Adult Students: Challenges to Teachers´ Continuing Education

11:30 Gather for bus trip to Banneker Park

12:00 Departure

at Banneker Park:

12:30 Picnic at Pavilion

1:00 Introductory video in Almanac Hall

1:30 Talk by Mark Hannun “Banneker’s Non-Algebraic Problem-Solving Techniques

2:30 Explore the museum and park on your own

3:30 Gather for bus trip to the Baltimore Inner Harbor

3:45 Departure

at Inner Harbor: see the sights, stroll the promenade, dinner on your own

7:30 Gather for bus trip to Towson

7:45 Departure

8:15 Return to Towson 

click here for PowerPoints of many of the presentations, videos of the plenary talks, and photos

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28

7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast available (for purchase) in the University Union: at PAWS (1st floor) and Susquehanna Dining Room (2nd floor)

9:00 Opening Ceremony (University Union, Chesapeake 3):

---Welcome by Rick Silverman, Immediate Past President, North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics (NASGEm)

---Featured program at Morgan State University, Baltimore, Gloria Gilmer, past president of NASGEm

Plenary Address: Ron Eglash: “From Ethnomathematics to Ethnocomputing

10:30 Refreshment break in Room 306

11:00 – 12:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Europe panel:

--- Charoula Stathopoulou (coordinator) and Darlinda Moreira: “Ethnomathematics and diversity in European school population: a study in Portugal and Greece with particular incidence in Romany cultures

--- Karen François: “Ethnomathematics in a European Context. Towards an Enriched Meaning of Ethnomathematics

---Monica Mesquita: “Urban Ethnomathematics and Ethnogenesis" (presented from Portugal via Skype)

---Nuno Vieira: “Counting time with ethnomathematics

Room 305: Ilhan M. Izmirli: “On The Ethnomathematic/Epistemology Nexus: Ethnomathematics and the Nature of Mathematical Knowledge

Room 306: (available for research reports)

12:00 – 1:00 Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Europe panel continues (see 11:00 am above)

Room 305: (available for research reports)

Room 306: Nicholas Goetzfridt: “Pacific Ethnomathematics: The Richness of Environment and Practice”

1:00 – 2:00 Buffet Lunch at Susquehanna Dining Room

2:00 – 3:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Spanish-language panel:

--- Mariá Luisa Oliveras (coordinator): “Ethnomathematics and Cultural Idiosyncrasy

--- Natalia de Bengoechea: “Métodos para Recabar Información Etnomatemática en Contenidos Específicos

--- Ma. Elena Gavarrete: “Findings of the Ethno-Mathematics Bribris and Reflections For The Formation Of Professors

--- Alejandro Jaén Rojas: “Conocimientos Matemáticos de la Mesoamérica Precolombina

--- Oswaldo Martinez Padron: “A Training Experience on Indigenous Venezuelan Teachers

--- Domingo Yojcom Rocché: “Knowledge and Mathematical Wisdom in the Maya Culture

--- José Juan Bolaños Suárez: “Etnomatemáticas y Pintaderas Canarias

Room 305: Mogege Mosimege: “Methodological Challenges in Doing Ethnomathematical Research

Room 306: Nirmala Naresh: “Bus Conductors’ use of Mental Computation in Everyday Settings – Is it their Ethnomathematics?

3:00 – 4:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Spanish-language panel (see 2:00 pm above)

Room 305: Eugénia Pardal Pires and Darlinda Moreira: “An Ethnomathematics Study at the Workplace: Masons’ Professional Practices

Room 306: (available for research reports)

4:00 – 5:30: Poster Sessions, Chesapeake 3:

4:00 Jason D. Johnson: “Social Justice Themes in the Mathematics Class

4:20 Samuel Aboagye: “Ethnomathematics: Enhancing students’ mathematics achievement in Ghana

4:40 Andrea Verdugo Rohrer: “Beauty defined by Makonde Ebony-Wood Sculptures

5:00 Irene Duranczyk: “Integrated Multicultural Instructional Design (IMID) for Undergraduate Mathematical Thinking Courses

5:20 Pedro Palhares

Evening: open, dinner on your own (walk into Towson downtown)

click here for PowerPoints of many of the presentations, videos of the plenary talks, and photos

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

THURSDAY, JULY 29

7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast available (for purchase) in the University Union: at PAWS (1st floor) and Susquehanna Dining Room (2nd floor)

9:00 Opening Ceremony (University Union, Chesapeake 3):

---Welcome by Bill Barton, President of International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI)

                (and organizer of ICEM-3 in New Zealand)

Plenary Address: Rik Pinxten: “Politics in an Indian canyon? Some thoughts on the implications of ethnomathematics

10:30 Refreshment break in Chesapeake 2

11:00 – 12:00: Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: Ken Ealey & Christine Henzel: “From ‘what ought’ to ‘what is’ First Nations Math Infusion: First steps on the journey in high school mathematics

Room 305: Mogege Mosimege: “Developments in Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Their Influence on Ethnomathematical Research

12:00 – 1:00 Concurrent Sessions

Chesapeake 3: A. J. (Sandy) Dawson and Don Rubinstein: “Project macimise: Mathematics and Culture in Micronesia: Integrating Societal Experiences

Room 305: Nirmala Naresh: “Ethnomathematics of the Myaamia Tribe

1:00 – 2:00 Maryland Buffet Lunch, Chesapeake 2

2:00 – 3:00 Closing Program, Chesapeake 3

Observance of the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the International Study Group on Ethnomathematics

    (history, memories, achievements)

Coming in 2014: ICEM-5 !

Late Afternoon: Chesapeake 2 and Room 305: Any other group meetings, research discussions, etc.

Evening: open, dinner on your own (walk into Towson downtown)

click here for PowerPoints of many of the presentations, videos of the plenary talks, and photos

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

FRIDAY, JULY 30

7:30 – 8:30 Breakfast available (for purchase) in the University Union: at PAWS (1st floor) and Susquehanna Dining Room (2nd floor)

8:45 Gather for bus trip to Washington DC

9:00 Departure

10:30 National Museum of the American Indian (on the National Mall, Washington DC)

--Talk by Florence Fasanelli, in room 3010 (third floor, in the Education Workshops area)

11:30 Explore the museum and perhaps have lunch on your own

2:30 Visit other nearby sights—perhaps the Air and Space Museum, next door, or National Gallery of Art, across the Mall

5:30 Gather for bus trip back to Towson

5:45 Depart

7:30 Arrive at Towson

Evening: open, dinner on your own (walk into Towson downtown; visit the street party on Allegheny Avenue

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, ThursdayFriday

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POST-CONFERENCE UPDATES

Here are links to PowerPoints from the presentations, videos of the plenary talks (courtesy Jeff Shirley), and some photos(courtesy Bill Collins).  Note: the videos are very big files and may be slow to load and buffer.

News about publication in the Journal of Mathematics and Culture will be forthcoming.

Some participants asked about how to join the ISGEm list-serve discussion group.  Here are instructions:

ISGEm Discussion List (Listproc):
The following are the instructions for subscribing to the ISGEm discussion list.  If they don’t work for you, please contact Rick Scott at pscott@nmsu.edu:
 ----Address an email message to: listproc@nmsu.edu    Leave the subject line blank and send the following one line message with your information and without the brackets: Subscribe isgem [your email address] [your name]

A report of ICEM-4 has appeared in the Fall 2010 Newsletter of the National Association of Mathematicians.  See pages 5 and 6 of this link:
NAM Newsletter Fall 2010  (written by Pat Kenschaft)

Greetings at ICEM-4 from Bill Collin and Rick Silverman (both past presidents of NASGEm) appeared in the February 2011, NASGEm News (Vol 5, No 2).  See this PDF attachment:
NASGEm News Feb 1, 2011 .pdf

The April/May 2011 issue of MAA Focus (the newsletter of the Mathematical Association of America) has an article on last summer’s Fourth International Conference on Ethnomathematics (written by Pat Kenschaft): see
http://digital.ipcprintservices.com/publication/?i=65363

PUBLICATION OF PAPERS

Papers from the 2010 ICEM-4 have now been published in a special issue of the online Journal of Mathematics and Culture, edited by Tod Shockey.  This issue can be accessed directly at http://nasgem.rpi.edu/pl/journal-mathematics-culture-volume-6-number-1-focus-issue-icem4  Alternatively, you can go to the website of the North American Study Group on Ethnomathematics http://nasgem.rpi.edu/ and click through to the Journal and the current issue.

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